Loading…
BUDSC19 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Friday, October 11
 

3:30pm

Registration
Check-in (all participants are required to register for the conference prior to the closing date, September 30)

Friday October 11, 2019 3:30pm - 6:15pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

4:00pm

Campus Tour
Sign up to take a tour of some of the highlights of Bucknell's campus with Jason Snyder, Librarian/Manager of Communications and Outreach! Our tour will leave from the uphill side of the Elaine Langone Center at 4pm, and will end at the Weis Center for the Performing Arts at 5pm. The tour is limited to twenty attendees, and will be cancelled in case of inclement weather.



Friday October 11, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

5:00pm

Opening Reception
Friday October 11, 2019 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Weis Center Atrium Lobby

6:15pm

Dinner and Keynote Address
Dinner and Keynote Address
Terrace Room

Speaker: Jean Leggett

Speakers
avatar for Jean Leggett

Jean Leggett

CEO, One More Story Games
Jean is the CEO and co-founder of games & edtech startup One More Story Games. Alongside games veteran and husband of 23 years, Jean and Blair have developed a simplified publishing platform to help non-coding storytellers create and publish narrative games. Their vision is to re-engineer literacy through video games. They’ve raised over $500,000 since the... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 6:15pm - 8:00pm
Terrace Room
 
Saturday, October 12
 

7:45am

Registration
Check in (all participants are required to register for the conference prior to closing on September 30)


Saturday October 12, 2019 7:45am - 9:00am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

8:00am

Breakfast Buffet
Saturday October 12, 2019 8:00am - 8:45am
Terrace Room

9:00am

Session 1- FLOW
Session 1-FLOW
#s1b
Walls Lounge

From Ideas to Scholarly Websites: Fostering Faculty-Student Research and Experimentation through the Digital Scholarship Fellows Program at Connecticut College
Lyndsay Bratton, Benjamin Beranek, Rose Oliveira, Catherine Benoit, Connecticut College

One of the strengths of small liberal arts colleges is the potential for rich faculty-student collaborative research at the undergraduate level. Our joint program between the Library and the Office of the Dean of Faculty at Connecticut College is rapidly building a strong community of practice in digital scholarship where previously there was none. The program brings three faculty members together with staff from across the library's departments, including research librarians, archivists, instructional technologists, and programmers, for three semesters. The program supports projects that promote faculty-student collaboration across the lifecycle of a digital research project through course assignments, independent studies, and summer research assistantships.

Write That Down!: The Importance of Internal Documentation During Project Development
Chris Deems, Ohio Northern University

When creativity sparks and the outpouring of ideas begins, information can be lost amongst the initial excitement. Documentation of these sparks can serve as not only a timeline of project development, but also as a knowledge base and roadmap for the future of the project. This lightening talk will focus on the retrospective importance and value of having documented ideas during the development of a new institutional repository at a small private university. Attendees will learn how the documentation was developed, how it was used to create a workshop for the university's liaison librarians, and the important role that consistent and ongoing internal documentation serves in the flow from spark to sharing.  

Every Spark Needs a Fireplace: The Makerspace in Juniata College’s DH Ecology 
Donald Braxton, Luke Kresse, Juniata College

Since 2017, Juniata College has been developing a digital humanities certificate program. Related to, but on a separate track from, the DH certificate, many impulses have been driving makerspace campaigns on campus. By the time this paper is presented, a significant level of integration will have been achieved. This paper argues that a mature DH program really requires dedicated maker spaces.

Saturday October 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
Walls Lounge

9:00am

Session 1-SHARING
Session 1-SHARING
#s1c
241

Using Maker/Web Technology to Bring Student Created Comics to Life
Angelo Letizia , Notre Dame of Maryland University; Matthew Treskon, Loyola Notre Dame Library

In this presentation, we highlight the potential of student created comics to grapple with issues pertaining to citizenship in the information age. We also examine the use of makerspace technologies to bring aspects of the student created comic to life. The library has partnered with the faculty member on this creative endeavor by providing instruction on the basics web and makerspace technologies, facilitating the development of a co-designed WordPress site, and providing access to makerspace equipment. The library believes that such support is fully within the mission of the library as it supports two frames of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education: first, authority is constructed and contextual, second, information creation is a process.

Mining Memory: Using OHMS and Omeka to preserve the stories of the Anthracite Coal Region
Courtney Hugo, Danville High School

The Anthracite Coal Region of Pennsylvania has a rare history due to the different nationalities who immigrated to work in the coal mines. Once a booming city, Shamokin, Pennsylvania, as well as the surrounding towns, struggled when the mining and other industries left the area. The people who experienced this change have stories to tell about what it was like growing up in the coal region and the importance of their community and faith. In the spring of 2018, Bucknell University Professor Katherine Faull was approached by Father Martin Kobos of the Franciscan Friars of Mother Cabrini Friary with a project to help preserve the stories of the people from the Mother Cabrini Catholic parish. Students in Professor Faull’s HUMN 330 class traveled to Shamokin to meet with volunteers willing to be interviewed about their lives. Explore how tools like the University of Kentucky’s Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS), StoryMapJS, and Omeka were used to preserve and share these important stories.

Saturday October 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
Room 241

9:00am

Session 1-SPARK
Session 1-SPARK
#s1a
Center Room

Collaborating on Machine Reading: Training Algorithms to Read Complex Collections 
Carrie Pirmann, Bhagawat Acharya, Katherine Faull, Brian King, Bucknell University

Interdisciplinary collaboration between two faculty members in the humanities and computer science, a research librarian, and an undergraduate student has led to remarkable results in an ongoing international DH research project that has at its core 18th century manuscripts. The corpus stems from a vast collection of archival materials held by the Moravian Church in the UK, Germany, and the US. The number of pages to be transcribed, differences in handwriting styles, paper quality, and original language pose enormous problems for the feasibility of human transcription. This presentation will review the hypothesis, process, and findings of a summer research project that builds upon the Transkribus (Transkribus.eu) platform and seeks to refine the process for creating handwriting training recognition (HTR) models to further improve accuracy. An undergraduate student working with a faculty member in computer science developed a deep learning model to help overcome challenges of accuracy in computer transcription.

Saturday October 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
Center Room

10:30am

Break
Break
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

Saturday October 12, 2019 10:30am - 10:45am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

10:45am

Session 2-FLOW
Session 2-FLOW
#s2b
Walls Lounge

Planting the Seed: How to Teach Yourself Digital Tools 
Claire Cahoon, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Technology is constantly evolving, and information professionals evolve with it - but how do we start teaching ourselves new skills? Constantly updating your repertoire of digital skills can be a daunting task, but don't despair! During this workshop you'll hear about techniques that will help you start learning a new digital tool in your area, then we'll work as a group to find motivation, strategize, and get started on learning. Everyone will leave with a plan to teach yourself a skill of your choice, complete with goals, plans to find help, and learning resources shared by fellow participants. This workshop hopes to lower the barrier of entry to self-teaching so that when the spark of inspiration strikes, we're prepared with the tools necessary to make our projects successful.

Saturday October 12, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm
Walls Lounge

10:45am

Session 2-SHARING
Session 2-SHARING
#s2c
Room 241

Populating a Repository with Useful Materials
Jonathan Grunert, SUNY Geneseo

In its first year, our digital repository garnered the attention of faculty and students alike. One of the driving concerns in efforts to populate the repository concerned filling it with material that people would use. In the months before launch, we looked at repositories at peer institutions and local universities, looking at their structures and the possibilities afforded by the platform. But as we dug deeper, we looked for the kinds of material most often downloaded, so we could strategize our approach to soliciting uploads from faculty and students.
This session addresses our research and strategies, as well as the challenges we faced and the future directions for our institutional repository.

Igniting Change: Archiving Born Digital
Kate Boylan, Thomas San Filippo, Mark D. LeBlanc, Wheaton College

We present an interdepartmental collaboration to build and deploy a workflow of effective practices for faculty and students as they create, catalog, manage, curate, and disseminate the growing collection of their digital works. The need for systematic workflows stem from a flurry of entrepreneurial work on our residential campus and has sparked our institution to action toward continual improvement and production of digitized collections. We report on a workflow with four faculty from multiple disciplines where pieces of digital scholarship are initially stored, managed, and shared on an individual's personal digital space, and curated pieces become a new type of collection elevated to and stored for wider dissemination and use as the foundation of new and future scholarship.

Saturday October 12, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm
Room 241

10:45am

Session 2-SPARK
Session 2-SPARK
#s2a
Center Room

Using Digital Scholarship Tools to Spark Entrepreneurial Spirit in Incarcerated Individuals
Jessica M. Grosholz, Jessica Szempruch, Sarah Gentry, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee

Prisons and jails often lack the technology found in our current digital world. Society continues to prioritize technological innovations, yet those in confinement are exposed to few of these. Meanwhile, studies show that digital literacy improves one's chances of finding employment post-incarceration and reduces the likelihood of returning to confinement. Since 2016, we have taught a nearly technology-free Entrepreneurship program at a maximum-security Florida prison. The course is expanding to a local jail with a more progressive stance towards technology. We propose to enhance the course by integrating digital scholarship tools, allowing us to improve the efficiency of course delivery while preparing our students to be successful as they navigate employment opportunities post-release.


Danger Ahead? Avoiding the Pitfalls of Emerging Technologies. 
Dorothy Ogdon , Brooke Becker, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Librarians are uniquely positioned to help faculty, researchers and students make academically advantageous use of these emerging technologies by providing both the necessary connections and instruction for their campus communities. The aim of this workshop is to provide participants with an introduction to the technical, logistical, and instructional considerations related to implementing virtual and augmented reality tools as part of university curriculum at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional level.

Saturday October 12, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm
Center Room

12:15pm

Lunch and Keynote Address
Lunch and Keynote Address
Terrace Room
Speaker: Jane Alexander

Speakers
avatar for Jane Alexander

Jane Alexander

Chief Digital Information Officer, Cleveland Museum of Art
Jane Alexander is the Chief Digital Information Officer for The Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA). As CIO, Jane is responsible for creating awe-inspiring and iterative digital projects that support a vision of innovation, technology implementation, and digital transformation that best exemplifies the mission of CMA. With an eye toward organizational transformation, Jane... Read More →


Saturday October 12, 2019 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Terrace Room

1:45pm

Break
Break
Elaine Langone Center Hallway


Saturday October 12, 2019 1:45pm - 2:00pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

2:00pm

Workshop-FLOW
Workshop-FLOW
#wsb
WALLS LOUNGE


A Journey through the Development of a DH Program for Undergraduates 
R.C. Miessler, Clint Baugess, John Dettinger, Kevin Moore, Gettysburg College

In institutions that do not actively integrate DH into the curriculum, introducing undergraduates to DH tools and methods can be difficult. However, Gettysburg College has facilitated a summer research experience for undergraduates. This interactive workshop will introduce participants to the Digital Scholarship Summer Fellowship program and provide a high-level overview of its development and implementation. Workshop leaders will provide guidance on developing a summer program tailored to participants' institution's needs and aspirations. Participants will come away with strategies for identifying stakeholders and partners, developing program goals, selecting digital tools, designing workshops, and methods to incorporate aspects of assessment and and sustainability.

Saturday October 12, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Walls Lounge

2:00pm

Workshop-SHARING
Workshop-SHARING
#wsc
Room 241

Disrupting the Maker Movement with Feminist Pedagogy 
Meaghan Moody, Chava Spivak-Birndorf, University of Pennsylvania Libraries

Makerspaces and the Maker Movement are failing women. Women are underrepresented in makerspaces due to a lack of visible and accessible female mentors and an unofficial narrowing of what it means to make that focuses primarily on high-technology maker activities. This session will explore the erasure of women in the maker movement and discuss the values and initiatives we are applying to engage and elevate women as we create and grow a makerspace. We begin by examining the barriers women face in participating in the maker movement and discussing our efforts to establish a feminist makerspace. This will be followed by a hands-on making activity informed by feminist pedagogy. Participants will then be guided through reflection to spark ideas and projects relevant to their own communities.

Saturday October 12, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 241

2:00pm

Workshop-SPARK
Workshop-SPARK
#wsa
Center Room

Create Stunning Visual Stories using Adobe Spark 
Terry A Davidson

Learn how to obtain access to spark.adobe.com to create Spark Posts or Spark pages. Demonstrate how to use available templates or create files from scratch. Demonstrate how to use stock photos, or custom photos and videos, to turn ideas into stunning visual stories. Participants will create, publish and share their creations. Activities involving their smartphones would be used to capture pictures and videos for their Spark creations. Selected individuals will share their Sparks with the group and provide their thoughts on how they could utilize Spark on their campus. Spark mobile apps will be downloaded so users should be sure to know the login and password credentials for their app store. Participants should have access to 15-20 personal photos to use during the workshop.




Saturday October 12, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Center Room

3:30pm

Break
Break
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

Saturday October 12, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

3:45pm

Session 3-FLOW
Session 3-FLOW
#s3b
Walls Lounge


Consortial Collaboration to Spark Faculty Interest in Digital Pedagogy 
Debby Andreadis, Denison University; Ben Daigle, Five Colleges of Ohio; Megan Mitchell, Oberlin College; Eugene Rutigliano, Ohio Wesleyan University; Catherine Heil, College of Wooster

Librarians from the Five Colleges of Ohio collaborated to develop and present a series of traveling workshops on digital tools, primarily Omeka and Scalar, for faculty members of the colleges. The workshops have led to adoption of these tools in a variety of courses on each campus. We will discuss our approach to planning and implementation, as well as faculty responses to the workshops. We will also discuss workshop outcomes such as the classes using the platforms, research projects, and a possible new major. Pooling knowledge and collaborating with colleagues from similarly situated institutions (small liberal arts colleges) made it possible for us to provide faculty with hands-on experiences with digital tools that sparked interested in the new forms of pedagogy and scholarship.

ILiADS: The Journey
Rachel Starry, University of Buffalo; Jacob Heil, College of Wooster; Sundi Richard, Davidson College; Alicia Peaker, Bryn Mawr College

Five years ago, the Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship (ILiADS) premiered at Hamilton College with an eye to filling a void in the liberal arts professional development landscape. ILiADS recognizes that project teams include specialists across divisions -- faculty, staff, and students -- and supports teams that bring various specialists' voices and visions to bear on the questions at hand.

Our panel will highlight recent developments in ILiADS' growth, most of which stem from its first year with an elected Steering Committee (2018-2019). We will, in other words, highlight specific aspects of our recent flow by explaining how we baked the collaborative, values-first sparks of ILiADS into the development of sustainable infrastructure for this burgeoning Institute.

Saturday October 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Walls Lounge

3:45pm

Session 3-SHARING
Session 3-SHARING
#s3c
Room 241


The Impact of Mobile Technology on Two Study Away Summer Programs 
Neal Baker, José-Ignacio Pareja, Earlham College

This presentation shares lessons learned and student outcomes for place-based, digital assignments on Earlham College study away programs in Italy and northern England/Scotland during May 2019. The Italy program was comprised of first-year, first-generation students while the UK program included first-year to senior students from different majors. Digital assignments involved e.g. audio podcasting, video documentary, and frequent photo/short essay multimodal writing prompts to foster group discussion in addition to personal reflection. Both programs asked students to reflect on how they thought technology affected their experience. Low-cost, mobile infrastructure involved e.g. DSLR cameras, a GoPro camera, smartphones, microphones, WeVideo, Google Sites, WhatsApp, and Facebook.

The Digital Archiving Lab: Encouraging Creativity, Collaboration, and Confidence Through Digitization
Angie Kemp, University of Mary Washington

The Digital Archiving Lab at the University of Mary Washington is a place for the digitization of rare and unique materials in the library's collections, and it is also a place where students, staff, faculty, and community members collaborate to create complex digital collections, preserve community history, learn marketable skills, and build confidence with digital tools. This talk will discuss how a digitization lab can grow into a space for creativity and collaboration, as well as some of the fantastic projects that have been developed as a result.  

Saturday October 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Room 241

3:45pm

Session 3-SPARK
Session 3-SPARK
#s3a
Center Room


Virtual Black Boxes: Building Theater Sets in Virtual Reality 
Mark Wardecker, Bretton White, Timothy Stonesifer, Colby College

Unlike literature or plastic arts, theater and performance are artistic forms that demand embodiment. In a recent Latin American Theater class, we introduced students to important 20th century Latin American theatrical texts and performance art in order to consider thematic and aesthetic components relating to a variety of issues. Further, we considered how the works we read have been performed, and how we might stage them ourselves, concluding with staging scenes in order to bring together our theoretical studies with embodied practice and enable students to engage corporeally with works that are oriented toward spectator/participant presence. In this interactive session, we will discuss how we used virtual reality as an accessible alternative to actual set construction.

"Americans in the Middle East in the Nineteenth Century" A Course and a Site  
Nina Safran, Dave Sandor, Kelsey Bell, Pennsylvania State University

A historian's interest in a murder case in Egypt involving an American defendant, prosecuted by an American jurist, before an American consul, developed into an undergraduate seminar on Americans in the Middle East in the Nineteenth Century. Her research into the context of the murder and its adjudication sparked the idea of creating a portrait (and biographical) gallery of the American community in Egypt. This led to the idea of an undergraduate seminar involving students in making history and creating a DH project. We will explain how the project team matched technologies and DH methods to meet the research and class needs. A student will share her experience of the course and contribution. We will conclude with discussion of plans for further development of the project.




Saturday October 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Center Room

5:15pm

Digital Poster Session and Cocktail Hour
#poster
Digital Poster Session and Cocktail Hour
Terrace Room

Creating Living, Breathing Story Worlds – Interactive Digital Media Storytelling for Educators 
Jean Leggett, CEO One More Story Games

The Harlan Hahn Collection LibGuide: "Guest-curation" as an Approach to Exploring Archival Collections
Thomas Philo, Nancy-Armstrong-Sanchez, CSU, Dominguez Hills

Examining Educational Math Applications: Going Beyond Star Ratings
Lara Dick, Emily Shapiro, Bucknell University

Building Open Learning Networks with Hypothes.is
Phil Tietjen, Pennsylvania State University

Zoonotic Diseases in Latin America
Cassandra Brown, Bucknell University

Chinese Food in U.S.
Yanyu Li, Bucknell University

Constructing the Past
Maci Mark, Gettysburg College

Populism and Human Rights Violations in Southeast Asia
Emma Poff, Gettysburg College

The Burma-Bucknell Conection
Aung Pyae Phyo, Bucknell University

Human Trafficking in the US
Morgan McMullen, Bucknell University

An Analysis of Student Project Reports to Support Digital Scholarship in the Social Sciences
Anna Newman, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Projecting the Glassboro Memory Mapping Project: Developing and Sharing a Community Focused Digital Scholarship Project
Mike Benson, Rowan University

What’s Happening?: An Experimental Journey of Inquiry 
Brianna Derr, Wake Forest University, Tammy Troup, Bucknell University

Using Digital Tools to Create an Inventory of Gender-Neutral Bathrooms at the University of Notre Dame
Matthew Sisk, Pam Butler, University of Notre Dame

Virtual Black Boxes: Building Theater Sets in Virtual Reality 
Mark Wardecker, Bretton White, Timothy Stonesifer, Colby College

"Americans in the Middle East in the Nineteenth Century" A Course and a Site
Nina Safran; Dave Sandor; Kelsey Bell, Pennsylvania State University

Saturday October 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Terrace Room

6:15pm

Dinner Downtown (on your own)
Meet up with others interested in dining in downtown Lewisburg.
Meet in the Center Room off the main lobby at 6:00 on Saturday. Weather permitting, Brandon Karcher will lead the group to restaurants downtown.

Saturday October 12, 2019 6:15pm - 10:00pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway
 
Sunday, October 13
 

7:45am

Breakfast Buffet
Breakfast Buffet
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

Sunday October 13, 2019 7:45am - 8:30am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

8:30am

Session 4-FLOW
Session 4-FLOW
#s4b
Walls Lounge

Toward a Collaborative Archival Storymaking Model: Lessons Learned, Paths Forward 
Susan Falciani Maldonado, Dr. Kate Ranieri, Anthony Dalton, Emily Robinson, Haley Hnatuk, Muhlenberg College

From one question - would the college archivist be interested in helping to preserve the archives of the oldest community band in the United States - flowed an integrative learning course that combined archival science, documentary fieldwork, and digital storytelling in collaboration with the 190-year-old Allentown Band. This session shares how our [work-in-progress] Collaborative Archival Storymaking Model evolved and has been applied in creating archival finding aids, oral histories of band members and digital stories about the history of the Band.

The Collaborative Archival Storymaking Model grounds students in primary sources--historical materials and oral histories--empowering them to craft stories in a digital format that feels most expressive to both the student and the community

Sunday October 13, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Walls Lounge

8:30am

Session 4-SHARING
Session 4-SHARING
#s4c
Room 241

Data Storytelling in the Visualization Lab 
Rob Weidman, Stephen Sakasitz, Lehigh University

Lehigh University's 2018-2019 Digital Scholarship Faculty Fellowship provided support for the planning and implementation of a Data Storytelling course using the Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning (CITL) Visualization Lab. This presentation will trace the progress of this fellowship and associated course from the initial spark of the idea (the fellowship proposal), through the flow of the course (collaboration between the faculty fellow, CITL staff, and the students), to the final sharing of the students' work using the technology and space of the Visualization Lab, emphasizing this final stage.

What’s Happening?: An Experimental Journey of Inquiry
Brianna Derr, Wake Forest University; Tammy Troup, Bucknell University

What began as casual conversations between an instructional technologist with a passion for multimodal storytelling and a librarian with a love of art and the creative process sparked an experimental journey of inquiry. Through a series of recorded conversations, Tammy and Brianna, discuss passions, artistic endeavors, technology, and scholarship through its various forms. The aim is to spark innovation inside or outside of the classroom and encourage others to expand on the existing methods of inquiry. We hope this session will serve as a creative and educational space for community, conversation, and innovation for inquisitive minds.


Sunday October 13, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241

8:30am

Session 4-SPARK
Sesson 4-SPARK
#s4a
Center Room


Digital Text Analysis and the Study of Ignorance: Drilling for Arctic Oil in the 1970s 
Andrew Stuhl, Bucknell University

What can digital text analysis teach us about what we don't know? Agnotology is an emerging field of study that highlights the deliberate production of ignorance as a societal condition. In this talk, I present the historical case of Arctic offshore oil development in the 1970s to explore what digital text analysis can offer the study of agnotology.

The Digital Humanities Summer Scholars Program at Lafayette College 
Angela Perkins, Bec Stargel, Aidy Ung, Lafayette College

Lafayette College's Digital Humanities Summer Scholars is a six-week long (this year's program ran from May 21 to June 28, 2018), funded by the Lafayette College Libraries. The Summer Scholars enjoy presenting their digital research projects to Bucknell University's Digital Scholarship Conference community annually. Our program emphasizes cultivating academic, intellectual, and ethical values in doing original research, as well as engagement with transformative digital technology and multimodal, interdisciplinary research methods/methodology. This year's cohort focused on creating digital research projects which spanned an impressive range of ideas, such as historical plight of Roma people in European analysis of 1930s Japanese postcards issued with a women's magazine in pre-war Tokyo.

NOTE: Presentation Cancelled
How Ideology and Pedagogy Impact Technology Adoption in the Classroom 
Chris Bernard, University of Connecticut

How do ideology and pedagogy impact the adoption of technology in education. In this research, I looked at how pedagogical beliefs using Schiro's Curriculum theory compare to the adoption of technology in the higher education classroom.

Sunday October 13, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Center Room

10:00am

Break
Break
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

Sunday October 13, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am
Elaine Langone Center Hallway

10:15am

Session 5-FLOW
Session 5-FLOW
#s5b
Walls Lounge


Capturing and Communicating Narratives of Efforts to Address Food Insecurity 
Philip Asare, Arsh Noor Amin, Bucknell University

The goal of this session is to engage participants in a conversation about our wok on capturing and sharing narratives of those who interact with programs addressing food insecurity. We hope that this discussion can be applicable to capturing and sharing narratives in other domains. We began this work with a pilot study at the Lewisburg Community Garden (LCG) in summer of 2018 which were are running again in summer 2019 with three community gardens including the LCG. Some of our preliminary insights from the 2018 study were that although people came to the LCG for various reasons, some of the more memorable moments were the personal interactions they had with others at the garden, and especially on difficult days, having people to lean on for help was important.

Using Digital Tools to Create an Inventory of Gender-Neutral Bathrooms at the University of Notre Dame 
Matthew L Sisk, Pam Butler, University of Notre Dame

Sparked during a conversation about classroom applications of digital scholarship, this project combines an important social justice issue with digital tools. Since Fall 2017, Gender Studies students, with the support of the Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, have collected data in the field, locating and evaluating the single-occupancy all-genders bathrooms on Notre Dame's campus to create a map that helps members of the campus community find the facilities they need. These data have been collated into a database and a webmap (https://genderstudies.nd.edu/bathrooms/). While the project has met with significant support and success, we will also present on future directions and ways this work can be extended to other campuses with similar needs.

Sunday October 13, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Walls Lounge

10:15am

Session 5-SHARING
Session 5-SHARING
#s5c
Room 241

Projecting the Glassboro Memory Mapping Project: Developing and Sharing a Community Focused Digital Scholarship Project
Mike Benson, Rowan University

How can digital archive collections be used to make learning more relevant? How can digital scholarship be leveraged to increase curiosity, emotional attachment to, and appreciation for a local community's heritage? In this presentation, we will share our experiences exploring these questions through the development and sharing of the Glassboro Memory Mapping project, a community focused digital scholarship project that incorporates experiential and blended learning. We will share our experiences developing the project and how we used projection mapping as a design and presentation solution that wraps digital content around a three-dimensional structure (community building) using projectors to introduce students and the broader community to the rich history of Glassboro, NJ.

Student-Faculty-Librarian Collaboration: Building a Digital Bestiary, and a Collaborative Course Model 
Tierney Steelberg, Chloe Wells, and Jed Edwards, Guilford College

Together, a professor of Religious Studies and a librarian worked to revamp an existing course to incorporate a focus on digital humanities. The class was fully team-taught in fall 2018, and incorporated both disciplinary and digital scholarship expertise: students learned information and digital literacy skills in "Tech Labs" throughout the semester and worked in teams on cross-cultural comparative research projects for a digital bestiary, while learning about supernatural beings from around the world and comparative religious theory. This session will focus on the collaborative model and structure of the course and its central project, and will feature students who took the course sharing their experiences with collaboration and digital humanities work.

Sunday October 13, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 241

10:15am

Session 5-SPARK
Session 5-SPARK
#s5a
Center Room


Music, Place, and People: Reverb/erations, a documentary film
Kevin Kirner, Lehigh University

In the summer of 2016, I participated in an oral history project designed to record the experiences of Bethlehem's community of independent artists and the struggles they faced. One particular conversation sparked my imagination, leading to more interviews and, eventually, the creation of two short documentary films and an archival website. This session will screen Reverb/erations, one of the films, and allow time for a Q&A about public-facing research, filmmaking, DIY music, and how a project can iterate from conception to completion.



Sunday October 13, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Center Room

11:45am

Snacks for the Road
Sunday October 13, 2019 11:45am - 12:00pm
Elaine Langone Center Hallway